Kodhavagga - Anger

(verses 221-234)

Put anger away, abandon pride, overcome every attachment, cling not to Mind and Body and thus be free from sorrow.


One, who controls his anger when aroused, is like a clever driver who controls a fast going carriage; the others are like those who merely hold the reins.


Conquer the angre man by love; conquer the ill-natured man by goodness; conquer the miser with generosity; conquer the liar with truth.


One should speak the truth, and not yield to anger; when asked one should give though there be litter; by these three things one may go to the presence of the devas, the gods.


Those sages who are harmless, and are ever restrained in body, go to the deathless state (Nibbana), whither gone they never grieve.


The defilements of those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, who are wholly intent on Nibbana, are destroyed.


This is a thing of old, Atula, not only of today; they blame him who remains silent, they blame him who talks much, they blame him who speaks in moderation; none in the world is left unblamed.


There never was, there never will be, nor is there now to be found anyone who is wholly blamed or wholly praised.


Examining day by day, the wise praise him who is of flawless life, intelligent, endowed with knowledge and virtue.


Who deigns to blame him who is like a piece of refined gold? Even the gods praise him; by Brahma too he is praised.


One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) the body, and one should be restrained in body. Giving up evil conduct in body, one should be of good bodily conduct.


One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) speech, and one should be restrained in speech. Giving up the evil conduct in speech, one should be one good conduct in speech.


One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) the mind, and one should be restrained in mind. Giving up evil conduct in mind, one should be of good conduct in mind.


The wise are restrained in deed; in speech, too, they are restrained. The wise, restrained in mind, are indeed those who are perfectly restrained.


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